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Zero House – Meet Our Team!

Every year, a wonderful and eclectic team comes together at Endeavour, and the team that is building Zero House is certainly that! Here is a quick snapshot of the students of Sustainable New Construction 2017:

 

 

Britta Anderson hails from the other side of the Great Lakes in Minneapolis MN. She is an artist, activist, youthworker, and herbalist. In 2014 she began to work in the field of conservation maintaining trails in the National forests of the US. After re-connecting with her love of the outdoors and doing hands on work she has been seeking ways to incorporate that into her life more intentionally. In 2015 she took a short building course at the North House Folk School in Grand Marais, MN. This sparked her interest in the building arts and alternative learning environments. That same year she started a group in Minneapolis called Tools Not Tools to teach Women/Trans/Femme folks basic skills in the use power tools. In 2016 she worked as crew leader for a youth conservation corps serving underprivileged youth in the Twin Cities area. During this time she also completed an apprenticeship in western herbalism. She aspires to integrate her love of plants, building, and people into a practice that can be shared with her home community. In her free time she enjoys plotting her life around the wild seasonal harvests of her bioregion, riding her motorcycle, camping, making food and plenty of daydreaming with friends.

 

Hello! My name is Olivia,  I have always had a great fascination with the building and design world. We are living in a time where almost anything is possible and it’s very exciting to witness and be a part of the active change.

I think it’s so important to live in a healthy & reliable home and incorporate more intention and beauty within that.

I grew up on Salt Spring Island where I was exposed to a no “norm” style of building. Very inspired by the unique practices of building led me to finding this course. My goal is to build and be a part of the design phase in a house of my own someday. I think there is nothing more rewarding than being able to live somewhere you have influenced and feel good about its impact as well.

 

Mateo has been fascinated by sustainable construction since working on a straw bale cottage in the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec in 2009. He is stoked to be participating in the program in order to learn some of the cutting edge techniques employed by the Endeavour crew. Mateo has a particular fondness for tree houses, and is excited to bring his highly creative approach to the task of building a better world.

 

 

 

 

 

Michele Deluca drove with her friend Natasha all the way across the country in a little red car to participate in the Endeavour program. She grew up in Nelson, BC, surrounded by mountains, clear lakes, and good people. She graduated from the University of Victoria with a BSc in geography, and was following that path until she started reading about natural building and got SO excited she had to find out what it was all about! Michele followed her excitement to Endeavour, which has introduced her to so many amazing people and ways of thinking. She is looking forward to a lifelong journey of continually discovering and learning sustainable building and design practices. In her free time, she can usually be found hiking, camping, cooking, playing music or dumpster diving with Natasha.

 

Bill thought about building houses as a teenager – but it remained just a thought.

Decades later, Bill took the plunge. At The Endeavour Centre, Bill is not only learning the skills to build a Net Zero house from modules, he’s thrilled to learn design basics.

Since global warming has emerged as a prominent issue, Bill’s vision is to introduce Net Zero houses made from natural materials into the suburban market.

 

 

 

 

Hey I’m Ella, I’m from the West Coast of Canada. I love to dance, sing, travel, dress-up and be silly. I came to Sustainable Building out a love of working with my hands, living in alignment with nature and a desire for resilience in my own life and my community. After a few years growing organic veggies and selling them at the local market, I realized learning about renewable energy and green building was the next step for me. So far, Endeavour has been blowing my mind with all the current and innovative technologies we’re getting to experiment with. It is awesome to be exposed to the crossover of traditional carpentry and sustainable building and I can’t wait to see what’s next!

 

Natasha – coming soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dave – coming soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June – coming soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kailee – coming soon!

Zero House – Carbon Sequestration in Building Materials

The Zero House project has three key goals: zero net energy use, zero toxins and zero carbon footprint. This blog will look at the notion of zero carbon footprint, and we’ll explore how Zero House will in fact far surpass this goal through carbon sequestration in building materials.

The notion of the embodied carbon footprint of buildings has not received much attention in the past. Even now, it’s not a consideration within any of the major green building rating systems and is not a key goal in very many sustainable building projects. But if climate change is a concern, addressing the embodied carbon within building materials may be the most important issue a designer or builder can address.

During the harvesting, processing and manufacturing of building materials, there are always greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these activities. Fuel is consumed, chemical processes unleashed and resources expended to create any building material. However, some materials have very high GHG emissions and others are very low. Typically, materials processed using a lot of heat and/or electrical energy will have higher embodied carbon than those with less intensive processing requirements. Good examples of this can be found in the open-source database called Inventory of Carbon and Energy Version 2.0, which provides amalgamated data for a wide range of building materials. Companies are also starting to produce Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) that are third party analyses of a range of environmental impacts of particular products, including embodied carbon.

 

Calculating a building’s carbon footprint involves figuring out the weight of each material and then applying the appropriate embodied carbon factor. This will result in a tally of all the carbon emissions associated with a building. By this reckoning, Zero House has an embodied carbon footprint of 6.991 metric tons of CO2-e (which includes carbon dioxide emissions and other types of emissions expressed as units of CO2) emissions for this 1,000 square foot (92.9 m2) building. This is about 75.25 kg of emissions per square meter. This compares very favourably with the same house built to typical code standards, which would emit 134.8 kg per square meter. That’s a 56 percent reduction, which alone would be worthy of notice.

However, there is another side to carbon emissions and buildings. If a building uses plant-based materials in its construction (wood, straw, hemp, cork, bamboo, mycelium and recycled fibres of all kinds), those materials are partially made of carbon that has been taken from atmospheric CO2 and converted by the plant into its cellular makeup. Usually, the carbon in plants is released back to the atmosphere when the plant decomposes (or burns). But if we contain that plant fibre in a building for a long time, we sequester that carbon in the building. It’s the simplest form of carbon capture and storage (CCS); the plants do all the work of pulling CO2 out of the air, and we put them into buildings for a long time.

 

Zero House uses a wide range of carbon sequestering materials. In fact, the shell of the house only uses three materials that do not sequester carbon. We can tally up the amount of carbon sequestered in materials by calculating the weight of each material, factoring in the average carbon content (the Phyllis database is a good source for this). Most plants contain 40-50% carbon by weight. When this carbon is released to the atmosphere as CO2, two oxygen molecules are added to each carbon molecule, so we multiply the weight of the carbon by 3.67 to find the weight of CO2 that is being sequestered.

embodied carbon of building materials

Calculation spreadsheet for the embodied carbon of Zero House

As the table shows, the Zero House sequesters a lot of carbon: 32.26 metric tons of CO2 are effectively bundled up in this building! This offsets the embodied carbon footprint and we end up with a net sequestration of 25.26 metric tons. While a lot of this sequestration is in wooden materials, about half of what’s sequestered is in the form of “waste” fibres (straw, recycled wood fiber, recycled drink cartons, recycled newsprint, cork) that would have otherwise cycled directly back into atmospheric CO2.

This approach has great potential to help the building industry fight climate change. If all residential buildings were to take this approach, the 200,000-ish houses we build in Canada every year (at an average size of about 2,200 square feet) we’d be sequestering around 1.1 million metric tons of CO2-e per year. Add other building types (commercial and industrial) into the mix, and the construction industry could lead Canada in carbon sequestration.

With a “negative” carbon footprint from inception, Zero House also takes a zero net energy approach that will ensure that it has a tiny amount of operational carbon footprint over its lifetime. We’ll examine that in our next look at the Zero House goals…

 

 

Mycofoam Insulation for Zero House

One of the most exciting developments in the field of sustainable building is the use of biological processes to literally grow building materials. While experiments in this realm abound, the folks at Ecovative is one of the first to become available. Currently Ecovative is focused on packaging materials and other non-construction uses for Mycofoam, but its use as a building material is supported by a number of ASTM tests that show it to be a feasible building insulation material (see data sheet below). We are very excited to be an early adopter of this technology!

This spring, we acquired some bags of Ecovative’s Grow-It-Yourself material to experiment with forming our own building insulation panels. We are happy with the results, and will be casting some larger panels to be used on our Zero House project.

 

We look forward to growing the larger sheets of Mycofoam for the Zero House project. And we definitely look forward to the day when Mycofoam is widely available to builders everywhere!

Zero House prefab wall panels

The Zero House is designed to have zero net energy use, zero carbon footprint and zero toxins. But it is also designed to be completely prefabricated and modular! It features prefab wall panels, floor panels and roof panels that can be fabricated off site and assembled quickly. Prefabrication allows many benefits, including controlled conditions for construction, ease of construction and affordability.

 

The Sustainable New Construction student team is currently assembling the wall panels for Zero House. We are exploring a number of wall systems:

  • Double stud with cellulose insulation

    – This wall type is the most conventional approach, featuring:

    • 2×4 frame construction
    • Cellulose insulation from Applegate Insulation. Cellulose insulation is made from recycled newsprint and offers excellent carbon sequestration and is non-toxic, while providing excellent thermal and moisture handling properties.
    • MSL SONOclimat ECO4 wood fiber board on the exterior side. Fiber board is made from recycled wood fibers, for excellent carbon sequestration and non-toxicity. The 1.5-inch boards (which come in 4×8 and 4×9 foot sizes) offer an R-value of 4. The product has a perm rating of 25.9 perms, meeting our requirements for a vapour-open wall assembly.
    • ReWall EssentialBoard on the interior side. EssentialBoard is made from 100% recycled beverage containers, for excellent carbon sequestration and non-toxicity. The 1/2-inch boards (which come in 4×8 and 4×9 foot sizes) and meet code requirements for structural sheathing.
    • This wall assembly is 12-inches thick and offers a total R-value of R-40.

 

  • Double stud with wool insulation

    – This wall type features:

    • 2×4 frame construction
    • Wool insulation from Living Rooms. Wool is not a common insulation in North America, but has a reasonable market share in the UK and Europe. Carbon sequestering, renewable and non-toxic, wool has an excellent R-value of 4 per inch and handles moisture well.
    • Cork sheathing board on the exterior side. Cork is a renewable resource that is carbon sequestering and non-toxic, and is impervious to moisture. It offers R-4 per inch, and we are using 2-inch thick sheets.
    • ReWall EssentialBoard on the interior side. EssentialBoard is made from 100% recycled beverage containers, for excellent carbon sequestration and non-toxicity. The 1/2-inch boards (which come in 4×8 and 4×9 foot sizes) and meet code requirements for structural sheathing.
    • This wall assembly is 12-inches thick and offers a total R-value of R-42.

 

  • Prefab straw bale with fiber board

    – This wall type is a new approach to prefabricated straw bale panels, and features:

    • 2×4 framing around panel
    • Straw bale insulation. Straw is a locally available resource, composed of the dry stalks from grain crops (wheat straw, in this case). Straw is a renewable resource with remarkable carbon sequestering capacity, a good insulation value and is non-toxic with excellent moisture storage capacity.
    • MSL SONOclimat ECO4 wood fiber board on the exterior side. Fiber board is made from recycled wood fibers, for excellent carbon sequestration and non-toxicity. The 1.5-inch boards (which come in 4×8 and 4×9 foot sizes) offer an R-value of 4. The product has a perm rating of 25.9 perms, meeting our requirements for a vapour-open wall assembly.
    • ReWall EssentialBoard on the interior side. EssentialBoard is made from 100% recycled beverage containers, for excellent carbon sequestration and non-toxicity. The 1/2-inch boards (which come in 4×8 and 4×9 foot sizes) and meet code requirements for structural sheathing.
    • A small amount of cellulose insulation from Applegate Insulation provides a tight fit between the straw and the sheathing materials. Cellulose insulation is made from recycled newsprint and offers excellent carbon sequestration and is non-toxic, while providing excellent thermal and moisture handling properties.
    • This wall assembly is 17-inches thick and offers a total R-value of R-39.

 

  • Prefab straw bale with Mycofoam sheathing

    – This wall type is a radically new approach to prefabricated straw bale panels, and features:

    • 2×4 framing around panel
    • Straw bale insulation. Straw is a locally available resource, composed of the dry stalks from grain crops (wheat straw, in this case). Straw is a renewable resource with remarkable carbon sequestering capacity, a good insulation value and is non-toxic with excellent moisture storage capacity.
    • Mycofoam insulation from Ecovative on the exterior side. Mycofoam is an insulation made by growing mycelium (the roots of mushrooms) in a mixture of agricultural waste fibers. This material is one of a number of exciting developments in the field of growing building materials. Using natural processes that happen with a minimum of inputs, this type of insulation offers extremely low ecosystem impacts, carbon sequestration and a great R-value of R-4 per inch. It is natural non-toxic and fire resistant.
    • Wall EssentialBoard on the interior side. EssentialBoard is made from 100% recycled beverage containers, for excellent carbon sequestration and non-toxicity. The 1/2-inch boards (which come in 4×8 and 4×9 foot sizes) and meet code requirements for structural sheathing.
    • This wall assembly is 17-inches thick and offer a total R-value of R-41.

The panels are currently under construction, and being stored until the whole building is ready for assembly. Stay tuned for more blog posts…

Zero House: Innovative Green Building

The Zero House innovative green building project is based on three simple concepts:

  • Zero net energy use

  • Zero carbon footprint

  • Zero toxins

This joint project between The Endeavour Centre and Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science is being built for display at the EDITdx Expo for Design, Innovation and Technology in Toronto this fall, where show goers will be able to visit the home, meet the designers and builders and experience the Zero House innovative green building project for themselves.

This project is possible due to the support of a great many sponsors whose products and services make it possible to meet our high project goals.

Climate Champion Sponsors:

  • BiPVco – Providing Flextron building integrated photovoltaic modules
  • Daikin/DXS – Providing a mini-split air source heat pump
  • Inline Windows – Providing fiberglass framed, triple pane windows and exterior doors

Climate Defender Sponsors:

Climate Friend Sponsors:

Each of the materials and products used in the Zero House have been carefully selected to meet our criteria for this project, and we’re appreciative of the manufacturers and distributors of innovative green building products for making a project like this possible.

Follow this blog as construction proceeds to find out more about these products and our use of them on this innovative project!

Zero House Sneak Peak

Zero House Project sets ambitious goals

Can we build homes with a zero carbon footprint, that use net zero energy and contain zero toxins?

The Sustainable New Construction class of 2017 is undertaking to answer that question with a resounding “Yes!” And they will be doing it in a completely modular, prefabricated form, at a realistic market cost.

Zero House is a demonstration project being undertaken by Endeavour Centre and Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science. The plan originated as SolarBLOCK by ECOstudio, a multi-unit design for urban infill sites. Zero House is a scaled version of a single module of the larger plan – one piece of a potentially larger development.

Zero House is designed to consume no more electricity than it produces in a year, and will use no fossil fuels. The building will sequester more carbon in its plant-based materials (which include wood, straw, mycelium, and recycled paper) than were emitted during material production, positioning it as an important solution to climate change. No materials inside Zero House will contain any questionable chemical content and the building will have an active ventilation system to provide the highest indoor air quality for occupants.

The project will be built in Peterborough in modular components, and then dismantled and rebuilt at the EDITdx Expo for Design, Innovation and Technology in Toronto this fall, where show goers will be able to visit the home, meet the designers and builders and experience Zero House for themselves.

Zero House

The class of 2017 gathers to start Zero House by making mycelium insulation samples.

The project is being sponsored by many progressive material and system manufacturers, and we will introduce them as their components are placed in the building.

We will keep an ongoing journal of the construction of this project, so keep watching here for updates and to follow our progress!

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