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New Sustainable Renovations program

Endeavour Centre now offers full-time, certificate program in Sustainable Renovations! Program starts September, 2017…

Thousands of aging homes across Canada are confronting owners with expensive energy bills, uncomfortable indoor environment quality, a large carbon footprint and sometimes health concerns. Addressing these issues is no easy task, but the faculty at the Endeavour Centre is uniquely qualified to teach renovators and designers to vastly improve the quality of older homes affordably and responsibly.

The 4-month, full time Sustainable Renovations program employs a unique curriculum that mixes experiential education on a real renovation project with focused classroom curriculum to provide students with an immersive and in-depth education. This teaching model has been honed in the school’s Sustainable New Construction program, now entering its sixth year and responsible for training dozens of students on award-winning building projects.

Sustainable Renovations

Students will learn how to assess green building materials and strategies, source healthy materials, perform energy audits and design for energy efficiency, responsibly handle construction waste and be part of an integrated design and construction team, while participating hands-on start to finish of a project.

Lead instructor Shane MacInnes has spent years as a project coordinator for leading green renovations companies in Ontario and British Columbia. “There are so many opportunities for meaningful work in this field, and I’m excited to welcome students with and without construction experience into Sustainable Renovations.” MacInnes believes that “experiential education is the key to becoming a well-rounded renovator, one who understands the key principles and knows how put them into action.”

Endeavour director Chris Magwood is excited to be adding Sustainable Renovations to the school’s full-time, certificate program offerings. Having taught hundreds of students in sustainable new construction who have gone on to have careers in the field, he sees renovations as a key part of a cleaner, greener world. “Dealing responsibly with our existing housing stock is critical to our economic and ecological future, and we are excited to contribute meaningfully to this effort with this new course offering.”

Sustainable Renovations

The new full-time program begins on September 5 and runs until December 22, in Peterborough, Ontario. It is open to students with or without construction experience. More details are available on the program’s web page.

Zero House Sneak Peak

Zero House Project sets ambitious goals

Can we build homes with a zero carbon footprint, that use net zero energy and contain zero toxins?

The Sustainable New Construction class of 2017 is undertaking to answer that question with a resounding “Yes!” And they will be doing it in a completely modular, prefabricated form, at a realistic market cost.

Zero House is a demonstration project being undertaken by Endeavour Centre and Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science. The plan originated as SolarBLOCK by ECOstudio, a multi-unit design for urban infill sites. Zero House is a scaled version of a single module of the larger plan – one piece of a potentially larger development.

Zero House is designed to consume no more electricity than it produces in a year, and will use no fossil fuels. The building will sequester more carbon in its plant-based materials (which include wood, straw, mycelium, and recycled paper) than were emitted during material production, positioning it as an important solution to climate change. No materials inside Zero House will contain any questionable chemical content and the building will have an active ventilation system to provide the highest indoor air quality for occupants.

The project will be built in Peterborough in modular components, and then dismantled and rebuilt at the EDITdx Expo for Design, Innovation and Technology in Toronto this fall, where show goers will be able to visit the home, meet the designers and builders and experience Zero House for themselves.

Zero House

The class of 2017 gathers to start Zero House by making mycelium insulation samples.

The project is being sponsored by many progressive material and system manufacturers, and we will introduce them as their components are placed in the building.

We will keep an ongoing journal of the construction of this project, so keep watching here for updates and to follow our progress!

Composting Toilet Basics

Composting toilets are the most misunderstood element of an ecologically friendly building. There’s no need to be scared!

This introduction to composting toilet basics is adapted from the book Making Better Buildings by Chris Magwood:

 

Composting Toilet Basics

Composting toilets collect urine and feces — referred to as humanure in the rest of this chapter — and treat it completely on-site, until it is transformed into useful compost or humus.

This category of treatment system does not include common pit outhouses, which do not provide ideal conditions for the conversion of humanure to compost, though given enough time the material in a pit toilet can undergo this transformation.

There are three common types of composting toilet:

 

Bucket toilet — This low-tech version of the composting toilet uses a bucket or similar portable receptacle placed under a seat/container to receive humanure deposits. Sawdust, wood shavings, chopped straw or another form of cellulose material is used to cover each deposit in the toilet, helping to reduce odor, absorb urine and provide aeration. Once full, the bucket is emptied into an outdoor compost heap. Here the material is layered and mixed and covered with more cellulose material, providing the right conditions for the natural conversion to compost/humus.

The indoor toilet construction is usually provided with passive or active ventilation, but no water connection or flushing action is used.

Self-contained toilet — These units provide a seat over an integral composting tray in a single, self-contained structure. Humanure deposits are received in the tray and provided with the appropriate conditions for composting action within the unit. These toilets all use some form of mechanical ventilation to reduce odor. Excess urine may require a separate handling system, or heat may be used to speed evaporation. Due to limited storage capacity, these toilets normally use some form of mechanical action and/or acceleration for the composting process and are only suitable for low numbers of users or for intermittent use.

The compost tray is removed from the unit when processing is complete or when the tray is full. It is often necessary to have an outdoor compost heap to receive material from these units, as it can prove difficult to complete the composting process within the unit.

Some models of self-contained toilet use chemicals or high heat to “cook” the humanure into a benign state. The material from these toilets is not useful compost, as the biological activity that creates rich, useful soil has been killed off.

Remote chamber toilet — A toilet (dry chute or low-water flush) sits above a large, enclosed chamber that receives humanure. The chamber is of sufficient capacity and design to contain and process a high volume of completed compost.

Units handle humanure in various ways. Some use heat and/or evaporation to rid the chamber of excess urine and water and speed the composting process, while others retain and process all material. Mixing or stirring capabilities, misting sprayers and rotating trays are options offered by certain manufacturers. Vacuum flush, allowing the toilet to be level with or below the height of the chamber, is also available.

Some units gather excess urine after it has passed through the bulk material in the chamber and retain this liquid as a high-quality fertilizer. This makes best use of the potential value of all material entering the toilet, as up to 80 percent of the nutrient value in toilet waste is in the urine. Once transformed into nitrites and nitrates after passing through the biologically active compost solids, the liquid can be a safe and low-odor fertilizer.

All chamber-style toilets provide humanure with enough time and adequate conditions to fully convert to compost before being removed from the unit. These are the only units that do not require additional outdoor composting capacity.

 

Types of waste handled

– Black water (though most systems are waterless)

 

Tips for successful installation

  1. Understand the maintenance requirements of any type of composting toilet before committing to installation. All require some maintenance, and dealing with humanure is not for everybody. Some units require infrequent maintenance, others daily.
  2. Check local codes before planning for a composting toilet. They are an accepted solution in some codes but not in others.
  3. Check local codes for the legal status of composted humanure. Though a good deal of documentation exists to show the material is biologically benign, some jurisdictions require compost to be treated as hazardous waste.
  4. Some types of composting toilets require specific layout arrangements that must become part of the home design.
  5. Mechanical ventilation is part of most composting toilets, requiring an exit tube that passes through the roof of the building with as straight a run as possible.
  6. Plan for an easily accessible route from the point of removal to the outdoors, to facilitate emptying of the toilet or chamber.
  7. Be sure there is sufficient provision on the property for units requiring outdoor composting facilities, and that the process of finishing humanure compost outdoors is well understood.
  8. When using commercially produced units, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for successful installation.

 

Pros and cons

Environmental impacts

Composting toilets are the only form of toilet that does not treat human excrement as waste, and rather as a potentially regenerative material for amending soils and fertilizing plants. A large environmental problem is thereby transformed into a solution to soil depletion, creating more robust growing environments.

The composting of humanure is not without issues, and untreated or partially treated material can be contaminated with pathogens that are potentially dangerous to humans and animals and can contaminate soil and ground water. There is a growing body of evidence that complete composting of humanure is relatively easy to accomplish reliably, but the correct conditions must be understood and created.

 

Material costs

Simple bucket toilets and appropriate outdoor composters can be built for as little as a hundred dollars. Complete remote chamber toilet systems can cost between four and eight thousand dollars.

 

Labor input

Depending on the type of composting toilet, labor input can vary greatly. Other toilets do not require direct ventilation, and even the simplest composting toilet has more components and longer installation times than a conventional flush toilet.

 

Skill level required for the homeowner

Installation — Moderate to Difficult. Multiple components and connections can complicate installation.

Use — Easy.

Maintenance — Moderate to Difficult. Some form of regular maintenance is inevitable with composting toilets. Bucket toilets can require daily maintenance to transfer full buckets to the compost pile. Chamber units may only need monthly inspections and annual emptying.

 

Sourcing/availability

There are many commercially available self-contained and remote chamber toilets. These are typically sold directly from the manufacturer or in specialty shops. Bucket toilets are homemade, with plans readily available online or in books.

Plumbing for any composting toilet system are standard components available through any plumbing supply outlet.

 

Durability

The simpler the toilet system, the greater the durability. Units with heaters and moving parts are more prone to durability issues. Consider the accessibility of parts that may need repair or replacement; if they are in difficult locations (especially if they require emptying of the toilet’s contents) they will be unpleasant to service.

 

Future development

Interest in composting toilets is just beginning to grow, and the technology is likely to develop rapidly in coming decades. There has been a significant shift in understanding about humanure, from a sense of revulsion and the certainty of contamination and illness to an appreciation of the simplicity and value of composting. It will be some time before this shift affects a broad constituency of builders and homeowners, but the research and experience currently being gained in this field by early adopters will be valuable contributions to a technology that is potentially transformative. There is little else in home-building practice that could so radically improve the environmental impacts of our homes.

 

Resilience

Build and operating a composting toilet system in a low- or no-energy scenario is straightforward. The bucket toilet is an excellent example of resilient technology, as it not only replaces an energy- and resource-intensive practice, but does so in a way that gives back valuable nutrients to the ecosystem.

 

Resources for further research

Jenkins, Joseph C. The Humanure Handbook: A Guide to Composting Human Manure. Grove City, PA: Joseph Jenkins, 2005. Print.

Del Porto, David, and Carol Steinfeld. The Composting Toilet System Book: A Practical Guide to Choosing, Planning and Maintaining Composting Toilet Systems, an Alternative to Septic Systems and Sewers. Concord, MA: Center for Ecological Pollution Prevention, 2007. Print.

Darby, Dave. Compost Toilets: A Practical DIY Guide. Winslow, UK: Low-Impact Living Initiative, 2012. Print.

Envirolet vacuum flush toilets

Phoenix composting toilets

2017 Workshop Schedule

Endeavour 2017 Workshop Schedule

We are excited to present a wide-ranging workshop series for 2017. Please click on the links below to explore each workshop!

We look forward to working with you in 2017!

 

TitleStart DateInstructorAvailable Spaces
NEW! Permaculture Design CertificateJuly 10, 2017Douglas Barnes12Register
Legal Process BCIN courseSeptember 11, 2017Jeffrey Chalmers11Register
HVAC House BCIN courseSeptember 18, 2017Jeffrey Chalmers12Register
Introduction To Renewable EnergySeptember 23, 2017Sean Flanagan12Register
House 2012 BCIN CourseSeptember 25, 2017Jeffrey Chalmers12Register
Part 8 On-Site Sewage Systems BCIN CourseOctober 16, 2017Jeffrey Chalmers10Register
Essential Building Science WorkshopOctober 27, 2017Jacob Deva Racusin12Register
Essential Hempcrete Construction (2)November 4, 2017Chris Magwood10Register
Essential Straw Clay ConstructionNovember 5, 2017Chris Magwood11Register
Carpentry for Women (2)November 11, 2017Deirdre McGahern, Jen Feigin5Register
Design Your Own Sustainable Home Workshop (2)November 18, 2017Chris Magwood15Register
Natural Plaster Workshop – Base Coat to Finish (2)December 2, 2017Chris Magwood, Jen Feigin12Register
TBA- Timber Framing – From Start To FinishDecember 30, 2017Register
TBA- Adobe Pizza OvenDecember 30, 2017Register
TBA- Concrete Counter Tops- Form, Pour & Polish!December 30, 2017Register
TBA- Engineering For Alternative BuildingsDecember 30, 2017Register
TBA-Rocket Mass HeaterDecember 30, 2017Register
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